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The Geerhardus Vos Center provides a focus for research that advances the interrelationship of exegetical, biblical, and systematic theology in the context of broadly Reformed epistemology. Vos’s interest in the rich diversity of the form and content of special revelation finds an echo in the Center’s various research interests: the interrelation of the interpreter’s beliefs, methods, and findings; the diversity that inheres in and enriches Scripture’s organic unity; the inseparability and significance of Scripture’s literary, historical, and theological features; and the importance of Scripture’s reception from the Second Temple period until the present as an interpretative resource.

“We are convinced that, to date, no one has been the peer of Dr. Vos in this department of Biblical study. This volume is therefore unique.”

Prof. John Murray, Westminster Theological Seminary (on Biblical Theology)

These foci ensure that the Center’s activities contribute to a wide array of contemporary theological and ecclesiological discussions. No less importantly, the Center is firmly committed to the integral nature of theological reflection and work that appears throughout Vos’s work and which ensures the unity of the various domains of the Center’s research.

The Center’s activities include research projects, academic seminars by specialists in biblical interpretation, and public lectures. Its seminar speakers represent a wide variety of backgrounds and are actively involved in research in the Americas, Europe, and elsewhere. Specific research foci are typically explored over a period of three years and culminate in the publication of the seminar papers in an edited volume. The research topic for 2020-2023 is “Diversity and Unity in the Old Testament.” The Center operates under the oversight of Dr. Michael Barrett, Dr. Jerry Bilkes, and Dr. Daniel Timmer.

“Biblical Theology, rightly defined, is nothing else than the exhibition of the organic progress of supernatural revelation in its historic continuity and multiformity.”